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Voi Webinar: A parking guide to solving e-scooter clutter

Voi Webinar: A parking guide to solving e-scooter clutter

Case example from Oslo, Norway: the world’s most extensive e-scooter parking study

Date: Friday, 12 February, 11.00 a.m. CET
Sign up here to participate.

With spring around the corner, millions of Europeans look forward to exploring their cities on light electric vehicles. Swedish e-scooter operator Voi Technology was founded with these people in mind, to make cities more accessible and reduce the noise and air pollution caused by short car trips.

One of the main challenges to greater micro-mobility adoption is improperly parked e-scooters, which contribute to street clutter and can be hazardous to pedestrians and other road users. Safety is Voi’s top concern, and we’re committed to finding long-term solutions to clutter that actually work.

This webinar, hosted by Voi, focuses on key e-scooter parking challenges and highlights conclusions from the report “Parking solutions for shared e-scooters”* (February 2021) by the Norwegian Institute for Transport Economics (TØI). To date, it is the most comprehensive report on e-scooter parking solutions, concluding that dedicated public parking spots have a significant positive impact on parking behaviour.

Participants:

  • Katrine Karlsen, Norwegian Institute for Transport Economics
  • Andrine Gran, Agency for Urban Environment, Oslo Municipality
  • Christina Moe Gjerde, General Manager, Norway, Voi Technology

Voi Technology invites you to attend the webinar and learn more about why the first step to successfully integrating shared e-scooters in your city is to ensure you implement the right parking and infrastructure solutions.

Date: Friday, 12 February, 11.00 a.m. CET
Sign up here to participate.

Read the full report here (Norwegian)
Read a summary here (English)

* “Parking solutions for shared e-scooters” is the result of a research project which was led by TØI researcher Katrine Karlsen and financed by the Norwegian Public Roads Administration, Institute for Transport Economics, Viken county municipality, Trondheim municipality and Oslo municipality, with contributions from the district of St. Hanshaugen and Voi Technology.

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